Art Newz

Can AI Truly Give Us a Glimpse of Lost Masterpieces?

Recent projects used machine learning to resurrect paintings by Klimt and Rembrandt. They raise questions about what computers can understand about art.   In 1945, fire claimed three of Gustav Klimt’s most controversial paintings. Commissioned in 1894 for the University of Vienna, “the Faculty Paintings”—as they became known—were unlike any of the Austrian symbolist’s previous…

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National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC plans to return looted Benin cockerel to Nigeria

The National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, plans to return a brass cockerel looted in 1897 by British troops from the royal palace in Benin to Nigeria, and is in contact with the relevant authorities there, a spokeswoman says. The cockerel, the only work in the collection to have been plundered in the sacking…

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David Adjaye plans slavery museum in Barbados as new republic severs ties with Britain

Complex that will include a research institute for the Barbados Archives—a 400-year-old documentation of the British transatlantic slave trade The architect David Adjaye is to design a major new heritage site in Barbados, the country’s prime minister announced this weekend. The new site on the Caribbean island will lie next to a burial ground where…

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Can Clubhouse recreate those art world conversations we are all missing?

I’ve been on Clubhouse—the invitation-only social media app gaining members even faster than it amasses bad press for privacy invasions—for about three weeks now, just long enough to get myself into trouble. I keep clicking on friends’ names without realising I am creating a new “room” to welcome them to the app. And when I…

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The Nez Perce Tribe Paid More Than $600,000 for Their Own Artifacts. Now They’ve Been Repaid

In the 1990s, the Ohio Historical Connection, previously known as the Ohio Historical Society, gave the Nez Perce an ultimatum: either the tribe would purchase tribal artifacts owned by the Society, or the artifacts would need to be permanently returned after their 20-year loan agreement expired. The tribe scrambled to come up with the $608,000…

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‘Too Often, BIPOC Candidates Are Asked to Come with Capes on for Rescue Missions’: Museum Directors Reflect on an Evolving Profession

Perhaps the most pressing topic in the world of art and culture in the United States these days is the question of who will run the country’s museums. Between the financial constraints brought on by the pandemic and urgent matters of social justice, museums are in a tough spot: struggling to stay alive at the…

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The Defining Artworks of 2021

After a tumultuous 2020 that involved the beginnings of a pandemic and worldwide upheaval, the art world began to slowly go back to a form of normal in 2021. Along with that shift came a number of developments that brought art-making in new and unexpected developments. There was the rise of a new medium, and…

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Winners of the Russian Art Focus Prize announced at Viennacontemporary

The winners of the Russian Art Focus Prize, an award for critical writing about the country’s cultural scene organised by the English-language magazine Russian Art Focus (part of The Art Newspaper network), were announced on Friday at the Viennacontemporary fair in Austria. The €6,000 prize is being split equally between two writers: the British journalist Theo Merz won “best publication” for his article “A tribute to the Russian avant-garde sets off a storm”, published in The Economist in 2019; and collective Agitatsia (made up of Dasha Filippova, Pavel Mitenko, Antonina Stebur, Vera Zamyslova and Anastasia Spirenkova) won “best research paper” for their article “Party of the Dead: Necroaesthetics and Transformation of Political Performativity in Russia during the Pandemic”, published in the online magazine ArtMargins.com in 2021.

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Cuba on the brink: artistic voices refuse to be silenced

ast month, Amnesty International named the Cuban artists Hamlet Lavastida, Luis Manuel Otero Alcántara and four others as prisoners of conscience: “People imprisoned because of their political, religious or other beliefs who have not used or advocated violence.” Both artists, who are outspoken critics of government repression, have been held in maximum security prisons on trumped-up charges for several months. The statement from Amnesty is “a symbolic gesture to the many hundreds more who likely deserve the designation”, says the organisation’s Americas director, Erika Guevara Rosas, calling for the “immediate and unconditional release” of all those imprisoned.

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As organizing accelerates, workers at the Brooklyn Museum vote to form a union

Full-time and part-time workers at the Brooklyn Museum have voted to form a union, Local 2110 of the United Auto Workers (UAW) has announced. The vote follows successful labour organizing efforts at a range of US museums including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the New-York Historical Society, the New Museum, and the Hispanic Society of America.

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