Resources

Can AI Truly Give Us a Glimpse of Lost Masterpieces?

Recent projects used machine learning to resurrect paintings by Klimt and Rembrandt. They raise questions about what computers can understand about art.   In 1945, fire claimed three of Gustav Klimt’s most controversial paintings. Commissioned in 1894 for the University of Vienna, “the Faculty Paintings”—as they became known—were unlike any of the Austrian symbolist’s previous…

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Can Clubhouse recreate those art world conversations we are all missing?

I’ve been on Clubhouse—the invitation-only social media app gaining members even faster than it amasses bad press for privacy invasions—for about three weeks now, just long enough to get myself into trouble. I keep clicking on friends’ names without realising I am creating a new “room” to welcome them to the app. And when I…

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The Nez Perce Tribe Paid More Than $600,000 for Their Own Artifacts. Now They’ve Been Repaid

In the 1990s, the Ohio Historical Connection, previously known as the Ohio Historical Society, gave the Nez Perce an ultimatum: either the tribe would purchase tribal artifacts owned by the Society, or the artifacts would need to be permanently returned after their 20-year loan agreement expired. The tribe scrambled to come up with the $608,000…

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‘Too Often, BIPOC Candidates Are Asked to Come with Capes on for Rescue Missions’: Museum Directors Reflect on an Evolving Profession

Perhaps the most pressing topic in the world of art and culture in the United States these days is the question of who will run the country’s museums. Between the financial constraints brought on by the pandemic and urgent matters of social justice, museums are in a tough spot: struggling to stay alive at the…

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The Defining Artworks of 2021

After a tumultuous 2020 that involved the beginnings of a pandemic and worldwide upheaval, the art world began to slowly go back to a form of normal in 2021. Along with that shift came a number of developments that brought art-making in new and unexpected developments. There was the rise of a new medium, and…

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‘A vast underwater museum’: Greece plans to open shipwrecks and other submerged heritage sites for visitors to explore

Submerged ancient cities, rows of amphorae from the fifth century BC, anchors from Byzantine shipwrecks, Second World War aircrafts: Greek seas harbour a unique heritage that is gradually becoming accessible to the public, experienced divers and casual bathers alike. In March, the Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports announced plans to open 91 shipwrecks—dating from…

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National Gallery of Art recruits the first woman and person of color to serve as its chief curator

The National Gallery of Art (NGA) says it has recruited the first woman and person of colour to serve as chief curatorial and conservation officer: E. Carmen Ramos, who has been the acting chief curator and curator of Latinx art at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Ramos will assume the post in August. The appointment…

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‘Very aggressive and violent from the start’: Palestinian artist films police crackdown in Israeli city of Haifa

The Turner Prize-nominated artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan turned over his Instagram account to fellow artist Inas Halabi on Tuesday night as she reported live from Haifa on the continued police crackdowns on protestors in the Jewish-Arab city. Nightly demonstrations have been taking place all week after hundreds of Palestinians were injured when Israeli forces stormed…

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The Met installs a plaque on its façade honoring the Lenape people, driven out of their New York City land

Amid a general acknowledgment of its links to a fraught local history of exploiting Indigenous peoples, the Metropolitan Museum announced today that it had installed a bronze plaque on its Fifth Avenue façade recognising the Lenape. The museum says that the move follows years of research and consultation on ways to honour the Lenape, who…

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James Turrell will unveil another Skyspace this year in the Colorado mountains

The American artist James Turrell will unveil a new Skyspace this summer in the foothills of Pikes Peak in Colorado. The work will be installed on a hillside in Green Mountain Falls, a bucolic town near Colorado Springs. The work—one of more than 100 of the artist’s signature light chambers with ceiling apertures open to the sky—will…

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